This Man Will Only Drink Beer For Lent – Here’s the Little-Known Story Behind This Ancient Fast

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Wow! Do you think you could do this?

Del Hall, an army veteran from Ohio, is fasting on only beer for all 46 days of the Lenten season. That’s right–he will not consume any sold food for the entirety of lent!

Hall explained that this Lenten fast actually dates back to the German monks in the 1600s.

This story in the Catholic Gentleman explains:

“German monks in the town of Einbeck developed a specific style of malty, dark, high alcohol beer to help sustain them during intense periods of fasting.

“This beer became known as Bock, a corruption of the name Einbeck. Later, discontent with the strength of Bock-style beer, monks developed an even stronger variant known as Doppelbock, meaning ‘double Bock.’ This beer was so laden with nutrition that some dubbed it ‘liquid bread.'”

The story then explains that the monks loved the beer so much that they wondered if it was actually an appropriate Lenten fast. They then traveled to Rome so the Pope could taste their brew. However, the beer spoiled on their journey.

The Pope disliked the beer so much that he approved this Lenten penance!

This Ohio Veteran is up for quite the challenge!

Hall said he’s carried out a water-only fast for four days before, but has never fasted to this extent. He told Cincinnati’s Local 12 News that he’s curious if he’s “up to the challenge, and if he’s “going to be able to do it or not.”

“I’m an army veteran. I was number one in my class in the army. I’ve run a full marathon before–26.2 miles. I’ve done big challenges, but this seems very daunting,” he told the news channel.

He added that he will drink water and check in regularly with a doctor over the course of the season.

Watch his news story below:

 Click here if you cannot see the video above.

Would you take on this Lenten challenge?

[See also: Is it Arbitrary or Necessary? Fr. Mike Schmitz’s Lenten Guide to Choosing the Right Penance]

[See also: Taking Up Your Cross Is About More Than Bearing Burdens, Priest Explains in Powerful Lenten Reflection]